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In the news

See Hinrich Foundation research and researchers featured in the press.


309 Results

Semiconductors 1

The Rise Of Silicon Nationalism — And Why It Matters

In this commentary on the rise of silicone nationalism published in Forbes and authored by Steven Zhou, Co-Founder and CEO of Moov, Hinrich Foundation Research Fellow Alex Capri was quoted to define the phenomenon of techno-nationalism and how it applies to the uncertain future of semiconductor supply chains. Techno-nationalism follows a new strain of mercantilist thinking - one that has historically been the rule, not the exception - that links technological innovation and capabilities directly to a nation’s national security, economic prosperity and social stability.

Globalization 1

1-2-3 punch to globalisation

Russia's invasion of Ukraine was a seismic event in global affairs which threatens to unravel the gains since the fall of the Berlin Wall. Given the level of integration of the global economy, would the world head back into one divided by geopolitical and economic blocs? What's might we lose? What's worth holding onto? In this Straits Times article, Senior Research Fellow Stephen Olson discusses how the crisis in Eastern Europe changes the future of trade and exacerbates recent challenges to globalization.

ST Ukraine China Growing Concern

Economic impact of war in Ukraine, Western sanctions on Russia spark growing concern in China

As turmoil in Ukraine caused global prices for commodities and energy to surge, top Chinese leaders have over the past week raised the importance of ensuring food and energy security for the nation of 1.4 billion. Analysts say the comments reflect increasing concern in Beijing over the economic impact of the war in Ukraine and Western sanctions on Russia, and will reinforce thinking on self-sufficiency among the Chinese leaders. "Beijing is walking a very fine line," said Senior Research Fellow Stephen Olson.

SCMP – Tiktok Russia

Ukraine invasion: TikTok's global ambitions take another hit as Russia's 'fake news' law forces suspension

The ByteDance-owned platform has largely followed its Western peers by banning Russian state media from using the app in the European Union. While TikTok "is acting in the interest of its employees and users to protect them from draconian laws," said Research Fellow Alex Capri, "as a Chinese company, the question will arise regarding possible pressure from Beijing to fall in line with China's geopolitical priorities and public position regarding Russia".

DIGITIMES Semiconductors Part 2

Political economists' views over Russia-Ukraine crisis, China and semiconductors (Part 2)

Russia's invasion into Ukraine caught the world by surprise. Half way across the globe, commentators are warning that Taiwan, where key semiconductor supply chains are situated, is likely to see a spillover of the war. In this interview, DIGITIMES invited Research Fellow Alex Capri and Dr. Ming-chin Monique Chu, lecturer in Chinese politics in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Southampton, to discuss the implications of the latest event and how company strategies should evolve with the trends.

In The News Capri DIGITIMES Chip Regionalization

Political economists' views over Russia-Ukraine crisis, China and semiconductors (Part 1)

Russia's invasion into Ukraine caught the world by surprise. Half way across the globe, commentators are warning that Taiwan, where key semiconductor supply chains are situated, is likely to see a spillover of the war. In this interview, DIGITIMES invited Research Fellow Alex Capri and Dr. Ming-chin Monique Chu, lecturer in Chinese politics in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Southampton, to discuss the implications of the latest event and how company strategies should evolve with the trends.

In The News Olson CNBC China Food Import

Russia-Ukraine conflict has a limited impact on China’s food prices

China’s emphasis on its own food production and security helps mitigate the impact of the Russia-Ukraine conflict on domestic food prices, analysts told CNBC. Ukraine has been an important part of China’s efforts to improve national food security by diversifying its suppliers of grain, said Senior Research Fellow Stephen Olson. “Any disruptions in shipments from Ukraine to China would undoubtedly create inflationary pressures,” he added.

In The News Olson WSJ China Outreach

China’s outreach to Russian economy extends only so far

China leader Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin recently declared that the partnership between their two countries had “no limits”, but there are constraints on how much Beijing can aid Moscow as it faces Western economic sanctions. This Wall Street Journal article has quoted a quick take authored by Senior Research Fellow Stephen Olson on how China is responding to the Ukraine crisis: "China is in a tough situation and will need to strike a delicate balance...It’s safe to assume the US Congress, along with the Biden White House, will be watching China’s reaction very closely.

In The News Capri DIGITIMES Panel

Supply chain regionalization: Russia-Ukraine, Geopolitics, ESG

The Russia-Ukraine conflict, geopolitics, and ESG (environment, social, and corporate governance) compliance are accelerating the tendency of the global semiconductor supply chain to regionalize. In this interview with the DIGITIMES, Research Fellow Alex Capri shared his view on the need for companies to factor in the primacy of geopolitics over economics, as the world returns to neo-mercantilism. The Ukraine crisis, for one, is accentuating ideological divisions that will have radical impact on the future business models of multinational corporations.

In The News Olson CNBC Russian Sanctions

China’s trade with Russia won’t be enough to offset sanctions, US says

China’s lifting of restrictions on Russian wheat and barley imports are clearly intended to offset the impact of sanctions, but it remains to be seen if this will primarily be a symbolic gesture or if it will have meaningful economic impact,” said Senior Research Fellow Stephen Olson. “China’s ability to offset the impact of Western sanctions will be determined by the scale and scope of sanctions ultimately agreed to by the U.S. and its partners... At this point, the West has not yet put all its cards on the table...

In The News SCMP India App Ban

India’s latest ban on Chinese apps casts shadow over mainland tech firms’ global ambitions

India's latest move to ban more Chinese apps points to worsening prospects for tech companies from China operating in the South Asian nation, analysts said. India's action indicates a "more fundamental fragmentation of the digital landscape" that has been under way for years, said Research Fellow Alex Capri to the South China Morning Post. As Chinese tech companies become "increasingly difficult to distance themselves from the Chinese state," they are expected to face stronger headwinds, according to Capri.

In The News CNN China Russia

Why China won't put its economy on the line to rescue Putin

Beijing needs to be very cautious about wading into a conflict between NATO and Russia over the Ukraine," said Research Fellow Alex Capri to the CNN. "China's current economic ties with Russia, including its energy needs, don't warrant Beijing risking further alienation and backlash from Washington and its allies. This could come back to haunt Beijing later." He further added that a strong relationship with China would likely only mitigate rather than neutralize the impact of Western sanctions on Russia.